Connecticut Statutes § 21a-267 entitled prohibited acts re drug paraphernalia differentiates three separate situations. In these situations, possession of drug paraphernalia is illegal and imposes different penalties for each circumstance. In addition, the three situations are as follows. First, use or possession of drug paraphernalia with intent to use. Secondly, the delivery of drug paraphernalia. Finally, the possession of drug paraphernalia within 1,500 feet of a school zone / housing project / daycare facility. Also, Conn. Gen. Stat. § 21a-277(c) defines the crime of “possession of drug paraphernalia in a drug factory situation”. Additional, the sections below explain these crimes, provide the relevant statutory language, and lay out the penalties for violation of each section.

Drug Paraphernalia

The definition of drug paraphernalia, as prescribed in Conn. Gen. Stat. § 21a-240(20) is very expansive. Also, it is so expansive. And, so many items may be considered drug paraphernalia, that the Connecticut legislature has adopted a second statute laying out the rules for determining what exactly falls into that definition. (see § 21a-270 in the appendix). So, the Connecticut legislature has defined drug paraphernalia as follows:

“Drug paraphernalia” refers to equipment, products and materials of any kind used, intended for use or designed for use in planting, propagating, cultivating, growing, harvesting, manufacturing, compounding, converting, producing, processing, preparing, testing, analyzing, packaging, repackaging, storing, containing or concealing, or ingesting, inhaling or otherwise introducing into the human body, any controlled substance contrary to the provisions of this chapter including, but not limited to the following.

Section One

Kits intended for use or designed for use in planting, propagating, cultivating, growing or harvesting of any species of plant which is a controlled substance or from which a controlled substance can be derived.

Section Two

Also, this refers to kits used, intended for use or designed for use in manufacturing, compounding, converting, producing, processing or preparing controlled substances.

Section Three

Additionally, it refers to isomerization devices used, intended for use in increasing the potency of any species of plant which is a controlled substance.

Section Four

Also, it refers to testing equipment used, intended for use or designed for use in identifying or analyzing the strength, effectiveness or purity of controlled substances.

Section Five

In addition, it refers to dilutents and adulterants, such as quinine hydrochloride, mannitol, mannite, dextrose and lactose used, intended for use or designed for use in cutting controlled substances.

Section Six

Also, it refers to separation gins and sifters used, intended for use or designed for use in removing twigs and seeds from, or in otherwise cleaning or refining, marijuana.

Section Seven

Additionally, it refers to capsules and other containers used, intended for use or designed for use in packaging small quantities of controlled substances.

Section Eight

Also, it refers to containers and other objects used, intended for use or designed for use in storing or concealing controlled substances.

Section Nine

Finally, it refers to objects used, intended for use or designed for use in ingesting, inhaling, or otherwise introducing marijuana, cocaine, hashish, or hashish oil into the human body, such as: Metal, wooden, acrylic, glass, stone, plastic or ceramic pipes with screens, permanent screens, hashish heads or punctured metal bowls; water pipes; carburetion tubes and devices; smoking and carburetion masks; roach clips. Also, this means objects used to hold burning material, such as a marijuana cigarette, that has become too small or too short to be held in the hand; miniature cocaine spoons, and cocaine vials; chamber pipes; carburetor pipes; electric pipes; air-driven pipes; chillums; bongs or ice pipes or chillers.

Conn. Gen. Stat. §21a-240(20)