Felony vs. Misdemeanor 2017-05-03T19:04:39+00:00

Common Crimes

There are two different types of crimes – felonies and misdemeanors. Felonies are considered more serious than misdemeanors and can carry a much longer prison sentence and more expensive fines. So, some examples of common misdemeanors in Connecticut are:

  • Petty theft.
  • Driving infractions.
  • Trespassing.
  • Disorderly conduct.

But if a crime carries a prison sentence of over one year, it is most likely considered a felony. So, some common felonies include:

  • Murder.
  • Manslaughter.
  • Assault.
  • Assault with a motor vehicle.
  • Burglary.
  • Home Invasion.
  • Assaulting a police officer.

Consequences

Conn. Gen. Stat. § 53a-35a. Imprisonment for Any Felony Committed on or After July 1, 1981

For any felony committed on or after July 1, 1981, the sentence of imprisonment shall be a definite sentence. Also, the term shall be fixed by the court as follows:

(1) For a capital felony, a term of life imprisonment without the possibility of release unless a sentence of death is imposed in accordance with section 53a-46a.

(2) Also, for the Class A felony of murder, a term not less than twenty-five years nor more than life.

(3) Also, for the Class A felony of aggravated sexual assault of a minor under section 53a-70c, a term not less than twenty-five years or more than fifty years.

(4) In addition, for a Class A felony other than an offense specified in subdivision (2) or (3) of this section, a term not less than ten years nor more than twenty-five years.

(5) Also, for the Class B felony of manslaughter in the first degree with a firearm under section 53a-55a, a term not less than five years nor more than forty years.

(6) In addition, for a Class B felony other than manslaughter in the first degree with a firearm under section 53a-55a, a term not less than one year nor more than twenty years, except that for a conviction under section 53a-59(a)(1), 53a-59a, 53a-70a, 53a-94a, 53a-101(a)(1) or 53a-134(a)(2), the term shall be not less than five years nor more than twenty years.

(7) In addition, for a Class C felony, a term not less than one year nor more than ten years, except that for a conviction under section 53a-56a, the term shall be not less than three years nor more than ten years.

(8) Also, for a Class D felony, a term not less than one year nor more than five years, except that for a conviction under section 53a-60b or 53a-217, the term shall be not less than two years nor more than five years, for a conviction under section 53a-60c, the term shall be not less than three years nor more than five years, and for a conviction under section 53a-216, the term shall be five years.

(9) In addition, for an unclassified felony, a term in accordance with the sentence specified in the section of the general statutes that defines the crime.

Conn. Gen. Stat. § 53a-41. Fines for Felonies

A fine for the conviction of a felony shall get fixed by the court as follows: (1) For a Class A felony, an amount not to exceed twenty thousand dollars. Then, (2) for a Class B felony, an amount not to exceed fifteen thousand dollars. Also, (3) for a Class C felony, an amount not to exceed ten thousand dollars. In addition, (4) for a Class D felony, an amount not to exceed five thousand dollars. Also, (5) for an unclassified felony, an amount in accordance with the fine specified in the section of the general statutes that defines the crime.

Conn. Gen. Stat. § 53a-36. Imprisonment for Misdemeanor

A sentence of imprisonment for a misdemeanor shall be a definite sentence and the term shall be fixed by the court as follows: (1) For a Class A misdemeanor, a term not to exceed one year except that when a person is found guilty under section 53a-61(a)(3) or 53a-61a, the term shall be one year and such sentence shall not be suspended or reduced; (2) for a Class B misdemeanor, a term not to exceed six months; (3) for a Class C misdemeanor, a term not to exceed three months; (4) for an unclassified misdemeanor, a term in accordance with the sentence specified in the section of the general statutes that defines the crime.

Conn. Gen. Stat. § 53a-42. Fines for Misdemeanors

A fine for the conviction of a misdemeanor shall get fixed by the court as follows: (1) For a Class A misdemeanor, an amount not to exceed two thousand dollars; (2) for a Class B misdemeanor, an amount not to exceed one thousand dollars; (3) for a Class C misdemeanor, an amount not to exceed five hundred dollars; (4) for an unclassified misdemeanor, an amount in accordance with the fine. This fine gets specified in the section of the general statutes that defines the crime.